Improving Access for Better Outcomes

211… Helping People Navigate

With over 60,000 programs and services available in Ontario, delivered by more than 30,000 non-profit, for-profit and governmental organizations, finding help can be challenging… particularly for those with complex or multiple needs. 211 is working with partners to break down barriers and improve outcomes.

Meeting Current & Future Needs

With the recent implementation of a modern telephony system, a business intelligence platform and an improved online experience, we are taking the time to consider opportunities for collaboration, and conceptualize how we will meet the future service and technology demands of residents who do not know where to turn when they need help.

Impact of Our Work

211’s impact is demonstrated in the number of connections to resources made every day through our phone service, our online channels, and our many community and provincial partnerships. The numbers tell the story of who calls 211, what they are looking for, and how we helped them. They also tell the story of improvements in people’s well-being as a result of being connected to services and to their communities.

Better Together

Our 211 system capacity – from our professional navigation to our community resource information to our data about human service needs – continued to be leveraged last year by our partners to improve access for Ontario residents, and to create service delivery efficiencies.  With pressure growing on health and social services, partnerships like these are great examples of collaborations that will have a lasting impact.

Navigating a Changing Landscape

211 began in Atlanta years ago because a few thoughtful citizens wanted to improve resident’s ability to find help when they needed it. Today, the same vision still guides us as 211 contemplates how we can best connect people to the services they need using existing and new technologies, and help people navigate the changes affecting the human services sector.

Meeting Current & Future Needs

2017/2018 was a year focused on imagining the future of 211 service delivery in Ontario.

Karen Miligan

Executive Director

211 can help navigate the confusing maze of health, social and government programs so residents know about and can benefit from the full range of services our communities have to offer.

The value of the 211 service to people who need help is clear – it is an easy path to the broadest range of supports available.  We continue to work on increasing awareness of the service so that more people can find the information and support they need.

We are working with stakeholders to answer key questions about our future.  How will new technology change how we serve residents by phone and online? How will residents want to access our services?  How can we best structure our internal systems and processes to maximize efficiency and maintain high quality standards? How can we ensure that our platforms can integrate with other systems, resulting in successful partnerships that benefit Ontarians? How can the data collected by 211 about what service users need and service gaps in a community inform program investment and decision-making?

These questions and more have been explored over the course of the last year. We consulted with 211 Regional Service Partners who deliver the phone, chat, text and email services, with local Data Partners who collect community resources information and share it with the 211 system, and partners and funders who share a desire to help Ontario residents navigate the world of human services.  Consultation continues this year with a focus on engaging users, both callers and online visitors, with these same questions.

While imagining the future of 211 in Ontario, we continued to develop strong partnerships at a local, provincial, and even national level. These initiatives improved the health and social outcomes for people living in poverty, for isolated seniors, for those who are struggling with mental health challenges, and for human trafficking survivors, to name a few.  This report tells the stories of how individuals got the help they needed and how 211 improves access and creates efficiencies for government and other partners.

After 15 years of delivering 211 service in Ontario, we have learned a great deal about how to help people navigate these systems. This includes acquiring an understanding of how to empower people to live independently in the community, and how to work with partners to break down barriers to service through integration and innovation. We are proud of the work that our staff do every day to help connect people with the supports they need. We know we make a difference, and collectively, we have made a substantial impact on the well-being of those we serve.

Read the full year in review

Making an Impact

211’s impact is demonstrated in the number of connections to resources made every day through our phone service, our online channels, and our many community and provincial partnerships. The numbers tell the story of who calls 211, what they are looking for, and how we helped them. They also tell the story of improvements in people’s well-being as a result of being connected to services and to their communities.

Caller Outcomes

1.6

%

of callers agreed to letting us follow up with them

85

%

of callers followed up on the referral provided

85

%

of callers felt they were better prepared

64

%

feel getting help from a program or service improved their health

Number of Programs and Services Maintained in the 211 Database

147,700

services are listed

29,444

agencies / organizations

92

%

of agency records were updated last year

211 Online

298,436

website sessions

1.7

M

social media impressions

Caller Satisfaction

290,582

calls made to 211 in 2017

96

%

of callers surveyed would call 211 again

83

%

of callers were very satisfied with 211

Number of Programs and Services Maintained in the 211 Database

147,700

services are listed

29,444

agencies / organizations

92

%

of agency records were updated last year

Business Intelligence Interactive Report on Why People Call 211 by Municipality/Region

  • The business intelligence dashboards below are best viewed on a desktop or tablet.
  • The numbers in the dashboard represent the types of services (Needs Identified) callers are looking for or are assessed as needing.
  • Click on a municipality or region under County of Caller to see the numbers on the donut chart that relate to the service the caller needed. Caller needs are tracked using taxonomy (a categorization system that is standard for 211 Service Providers across North America), and are rolled up to categories.
  • NOTE: The number of needs identified is lower than the number of calls to 211, as we do not currently collect information from (track) 100% of our calls. The percentage of calls tracked is 85%, and includes all calls related to priority issues and basic needs.

Caller Stories

211 South West Helps Caller Save Her Home from Rodent Infestation

A woman on the Ontario Disability Support Program called 211 because she had been dealing with a rodent infestation in her home and didn’t know where to turn. She already had one pest control company provide some service, but this did not resolve the problem. She could not afford to pay for an exterminator again and could not take care of the situation on her own due to her disability. She was only eating once a day to pay off this unexpected expense.

The 211 Specialist referred her to a local program that provides funding when people are denied assistance elsewhere or when their need does not fit into typical assistance program guidelines. When the 211 Specialist called this woman back, she was delighted to report that the local agency to which she had been referred agreed to cover the cost of the outstanding pest control bill and pay any additional expenses needed to resolve the issue for up to six months, if required. The woman had been ready to walk away from her home, which she owns, due to the negative impacts it was having on her health. However, because of the call to 211 and the help provided by a flexible and innovative funding program, she was able to stay.

211 Eastern Region’s Listening Skills Connect Caller with Supports

A caller who lives on social assistance was looking for help paying their utility bills because they had been off work for so long. While the 211 Specialist was searching for their local program, the caller shared that they had been sick so long because they had a rare blood disease that makes it impossible to work for any length of time. The 211 Specialist was also able to offer the caller information on a national support organization for that specific disease of which the caller was unaware. Active listening skills meant the 211 Specialist was able to offer the caller an additional resource for support with their condition.

211 Central South Connects a Caller with a Local Church's Benevolent Fund

An individual called 211 on a Friday identifying a need for financial assistance to purchase over-the-counter medication. The caller shared that he had been sick, vomiting and unable to eat for days. His source of income was Ontario Works, he had no valid health card and no ID (he was in the process of replacing it). He further shared that he had used his last 50 cents to call 211. In order for our caller to receive the financial support for the medication available from Ontario Works, he would need to provide a doctor’s note but he was not able to obtain one without a valid health card. An advocacy call to a health centre in his community revealed there was a 6-month waiting list for him to get in. Concentrated research via the 211 database found a church in his community with a small benevolent fund to help individuals (considered on a case-by-case basis). Our 211 Community Navigator reached out and spoke to the Pastor, who recommended that she meet the caller at a local pharmacy to purchase medication and provide him with funds to get food and get through the weekend. Our follow up with the Pastor indicated that the medication and funds were provided to the caller, as well as some information about other support options in the community. The caller was also able to provide his contact information to the church for possible work in the future.

211 Central East Helps Identify Resources for Mother of Four

A mother of four called 211 requesting assistance accessing mental health counselling. 211’s Community Navigator reviewed what steps had been taken so far by the caller, discussed various options for services and conducted a financial assessment to help determine the most appropriate options. The Community Navigator determined that the caller was married and had access to an Employee Assistance Program through her husband’s work. The EAP would cover the costs of counselling, but the services were only available during the day when her preschool-aged child was home. Once the Community Navigator determined it was child care the caller needed, she was able to connect the caller to two child care facilities that offered occasional and same day programs.

211 Central Helps Youth Find Temporary Housing Until New Apartment is Ready

A young man called 211 seeking emergency housing in York Region. He had recently been evicted as the owner of the property had sold the house. He had managed to find new housing, but was unable to move in for another three days. He spoke about his situation and as expected he was upset about having nowhere safe to sleep. The caller identified himself as having mental health challenges and mentioned he was taking medication that made him extremely drowsy. He had been falling asleep in the park but didn’t feel safe there, and the police kept asking him to leave. He also hadn’t been able to change his clothes and was hoping to get a pair of shoes.

The youth was unable to make any further calls to referrals as his phone battery was almost depleted. The 211 Community Navigator offered to make calls and find a shelter and transportation on his behalf, so he provided his location and cell number. The 211 navigator went forward with securing him a bed at a youth shelter. The Street Outreach Van was then contacted and they agreed to pick him up and transport him to the shelter. They also said they had some clothing and personal hygiene items on board the van that he could have. 211’s navigator called back and was happy to tell him everything was arranged and that the van would be there within the hour.

211 North Connects Youth with Money Management Programs to Manage Student Loan

Having recently received his OSAP payment, a post-secondary student called 211, worried he would spend his living allowance both inappropriately and prematurely. The I&R Specialist referred him to a program that helps people gain control of their finances and put together a budget for basic living expenses. The Specialist later followed up, and learned the caller had connected with the service in his area. He said that he learned a lot about budgeting and budget-related management tools, and that he now feels more comfortable and confident about managing his finances.

211 South West Helps Caller Save Her Home from Rodent Infestation

A woman on the Ontario Disability Support Program called 211 because she had been dealing with a rodent infestation in her home and didn’t know where to turn. She already had one pest control company provide some service, but this did not resolve the problem. She could not afford to pay for an exterminator again and could not take care of the situation on her own due to her disability. She was only eating once a day to pay off this unexpected expense.

The 211 Specialist referred her to a local program that provides funding when people are denied assistance elsewhere or when their need does not fit into typical assistance program guidelines. When the 211 Specialist called this woman back, she was delighted to report that the local agency to which she had been referred agreed to cover the cost of the outstanding pest control bill and pay any additional expenses needed to resolve the issue for up to six months, if required. The woman had been ready to walk away from her home, which she owns, due to the negative impacts it was having on her health. However, because of the call to 211 and the help provided by a flexible and innovative funding program, she was able to stay.

211 Eastern Region’s Listening Skills Connect Caller with Supports

A caller who lives on social assistance was looking for help paying their utility bills because they had been off work for so long. While the 211 Specialist was searching for their local program, the caller shared that they had been sick so long because they had a rare blood disease that makes it impossible to work for any length of time. The 211 Specialist was also able to offer the caller information on a national support organization for that specific disease of which the caller was unaware. Active listening skills meant the 211 Specialist was able to offer the caller an additional resource for support with their condition.

211 Central South Connects a Caller with a Local Church's Benevolent Fund

An individual called 211 on a Friday identifying a need for financial assistance to purchase over-the-counter medication. The caller shared that he had been sick, vomiting and unable to eat for days. His source of income was Ontario Works, he had no valid health card and no ID (he was in the process of replacing it). He further shared that he had used his last 50 cents to call 211. In order for our caller to receive the financial support for the medication available from Ontario Works, he would need to provide a doctor’s note but he was not able to obtain one without a valid health card. An advocacy call to a health centre in his community revealed there was a 6-month waiting list for him to get in. Concentrated research via the 211 database found a church in his community with a small benevolent fund to help individuals (considered on a case-by-case basis). Our 211 Community Navigator reached out and spoke to the Pastor, who recommended that she meet the caller at a local pharmacy to purchase medication and provide him with funds to get food and get through the weekend. Our follow up with the Pastor indicated that the medication and funds were provided to the caller, as well as some information about other support options in the community. The caller was also able to provide his contact information to the church for possible work in the future.

211 Central East Helps Identify Resources for Mother of Four

A mother of four called 211 requesting assistance accessing mental health counselling. 211’s Community Navigator reviewed what steps had been taken so far by the caller, discussed various options for services and conducted a financial assessment to help determine the most appropriate options. The Community Navigator determined that the caller was married and had access to an Employee Assistance Program through her husband’s work. The EAP would cover the costs of counselling, but the services were only available during the day when her preschool-aged child was home. Once the Community Navigator determined it was child care the caller needed, she was able to connect the caller to two child care facilities that offered occasional and same day programs.

211 Central Helps Youth Find Temporary Housing Until New Apartment is Ready

A young man called 211 seeking emergency housing in York Region. He had recently been evicted as the owner of the property had sold the house. He had managed to find new housing, but was unable to move in for another three days. He spoke about his situation and as expected he was upset about having nowhere safe to sleep. The caller identified himself as having mental health challenges and mentioned he was taking medication that made him extremely drowsy. He had been falling asleep in the park but didn’t feel safe there, and the police kept asking him to leave. He also hadn’t been able to change his clothes and was hoping to get a pair of shoes.

The youth was unable to make any further calls to referrals as his phone battery was almost depleted. The 211 Community Navigator offered to make calls and find a shelter and transportation on his behalf, so he provided his location and cell number. The 211 navigator went forward with securing him a bed at a youth shelter. The Street Outreach Van was then contacted and they agreed to pick him up and transport him to the shelter. They also said they had some clothing and personal hygiene items on board the van that he could have. 211’s navigator called back and was happy to tell him everything was arranged and that the van would be there within the hour.

211 North Connects Youth with Money Management Programs to Manage Student Loan

Having recently received his OSAP payment, a post-secondary student called 211, worried he would spend his living allowance both inappropriately and prematurely. The I&R Specialist referred him to a program that helps people gain control of their finances and put together a budget for basic living expenses. The Specialist later followed up, and learned the caller had connected with the service in his area. He said that he learned a lot about budgeting and budget-related management tools, and that he now feels more comfortable and confident about managing his finances.

Better Together

Our 211 system capacity – from our professional navigation to our community resource information to our data about human service needs – continued to be leveraged last year by our partners to improve access for Ontario residents, and to create service delivery efficiencies.  With pressure growing on health and social services, partnerships like these are great examples of collaborations that will have a lasting impact.

“211 works at the intersections between Health, Social, Community and Government services, helping to connect people to the help they need, when they need it. […] 211 is a partner in supporting patients – in particular those living in poverty – with connections to community-based services that help them stay well.”

Dr. Gary Bloch

Family Physician with St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, and co-Chair of the Ontario College of Family Physicians (OCFP’s) Committee on Poverty and Health.

Provincial Partnerships

Last year, we continued to work with partners across Ontario who see the results of economic hardship, and understand that residents are often not accessing the help available for their situation. Navigating and applying for help is difficult and services are often provided by small non-profit or for-profit agencies that are not well known. Our partners are leveraging 211’s capacity and infrastructure to support those living with a disability and their families, isolated seniors, those with chronic conditions, those living in poverty and the survivors of human trafficking.

Provincial Partnerships

While developing new partnerships that provide efficiencies and improve access to services, we continued to support existing partnerships in mental health for post-secondary students, in helping those with developmental disabilities and with our 211 Regional Service Partners. Our partnerships have put us in a better position to understand the challenges of integrating technology and different classification systems across sectors. This knowledge will help us to imagine the future of 211 and continue to learn how to best meet the challenges presented by evolving technology and the pressures on human services across Ontario.

Regional Partnerships

Our 211 Regional Service Partners (our six Ontario contact centres: Collingwood, Ottawa, St. Catharines, Thunder Bay, Toronto and Windsor) have been actively establishing partnerships in local communities and counties this year. From establishing a mental health crisis line, to scheduling appointments at tax clinics, to providing data for a police smartphone app, 211 is becoming better known as an effective partner on initiatives that address community well-being. See the stories below for more information.

Partnership Stories

211 South West Helps Community Agencies Organize After Heavy Flooding

In August 2017, the Windsor-Essex area was hit with a hundred-year rainstorm. Close to 7,000 Windsor, Tecumseh and Lakeshore residents were affected and reported significant flooding in their homes and property. As waters receded and the scope of the damage to personal property became evident, 211 reached out to several community agencies to determine what supports would be available to assist residents in the aftermath of the flood. Volunteer opportunities were identified for those willing and able to help with post-disaster clean-up, including the removal and disposal of damaged items, as well as building repairs to ensure homes were safe from mould and contaminants. Samaritan’s Purse sent a disaster relief unit to assist with this effort and volunteers were connected with seniors and others needing help. Other agencies offered cleaning supplies, assistance with filling out disaster aid applications, furniture donations, financial supports and information on disaster preparedness. This was truly a collaborative effort with various partners working together to provide the physical, emotional and financial supports needed by those affected by the disaster.

211 Eastern Region Connects with the County of Prescott-Russell during Floods

When the Spring floods of 2017 affected many regions in the County of Prescott-Russell, 211 Eastern Region reached out to the most affected municipality of Clarence-Rockland to offer assistance in handling inquiries from those affected by the floods. Since then, ongoing meetings are being held to document the needs identified during this event, to inform municipalities of the role 211 can play in times of emergencies, and emergency protocols are being developed. Through these initiatives, 211 has demonstrated they can play an essential supporting role during a local emergency.

211 Central South Provides Scheduling for Community Income Tax Clinics Pilot

For many years, 211 Central South has worked in partnership with the United Way of Niagara Falls and Greater Fort Erie in helping people file their taxes, and access important financial benefits, through the Community Volunteer Income Tax Program. In addition to providing support in navigating services and finding income tax clinics, 211 Central South offered appointment scheduling to callers. This year, through a pilot project, the partnership expanded to include six other community partners. A key benefit of this pilot was the increased support and linkage to services for individuals who called 211 to schedule their tax appointment. Through this pilot, we helped to increase the capacity of local organizations to conduct income tax clinics. Over 1300 tax returns were filed and over three million dollars in benefits accessed for struggling families.

211 Central East Supports Mental Health Crisis Line for Children and Youth

A partnership with 211 has been key for service providers in Muskoka, Parry Sound and Nipissing in launching a new 24/7, bilingual mental health crisis line for children, youth, their families, caregivers and service providers. 211’s Community Navigators answer the toll-free line, listen to the needs of callers and follow prescribed protocols to connect each caller to the right help. 211 brings value to this partnership as their teams are already trained in crisis intervention and mediated assessment. 211 is also 24/7, bilingual, and has the technical infrastructure to support on-boarding specialized lines which make this 24/7 crisis line affordable for small populations like Muskoka, Parry Sound and Nipissing.

Health Care Referrals for Patients in Poverty

The Family Health Teams in South Georgian Bay and Orillia are screening patients for poverty to identify those impacted by the social determinants of health. With consent from these patients, physicians send a referral form to 211. 211’s Community Navigators then contact each patient and conduct mediated assessments of their needs and connect the patients with the services and supports they need. The Navigators provide advocacy for vulnerable patients who need extra help, and conduct follow-up calls to ensure services have been accessed. 211 reports back to the primary care provider with the outcomes of each referral.

Community Asset App for Police Services Launched

A partnership between Ryerson University, Toronto Police Services, The City of Toronto and Findhelp/211 Central has given community policing another tool to help people get the support they need. The Community Asset Portal is a smartphone app, developed by students at Ryerson University, which provides a scrollable map of 211 data, connecting officers to community support services including shelters, mental-health services in their area and 211 Specialists at 211 Central. The app is an easy-to-use portal that allows officers to find appropriate services immediately for an individual experiencing a mental health crisis.

Barriers to Early Assessment & Treatment (BEAT)

The NorthBEAT project, a collaborative system of health, mental health and sector-specific service providers, aims to address barriers to early assessment and treatment (BEAT) for youth experiencing psychosis in Northwestern Ontario. In 2017, 211 North assisted the project coordinating team with enhancing the mental health care system for youth with psychosis by mapping different pathways to mental health care and identifying the community resources available to youth and their families. NorthBEAT’s primary objective is to increase collaboration and improve coordination within the system as well as expand its capacity to better meet the needs of youth experiencing psychosis. This regional network will help co-design resources, develop a community service inventory with maps, and integrate Early Psychosis Intervention into policy and practice. The project will continue until Spring 2021 and will give 211 the opportunity to educate community partners and community members about the value of 211 in Northwestern Ontario.

211 South West Helps Community Agencies Organize After Heavy Flooding

In August 2017, the Windsor-Essex area was hit with a hundred-year rainstorm. Close to 7,000 Windsor, Tecumseh and Lakeshore residents were affected and reported significant flooding in their homes and property. As waters receded and the scope of the damage to personal property became evident, 211 reached out to several community agencies to determine what supports would be available to assist residents in the aftermath of the flood. Volunteer opportunities were identified for those willing and able to help with post-disaster clean-up, including the removal and disposal of damaged items, as well as building repairs to ensure homes were safe from mould and contaminants. Samaritan’s Purse sent a disaster relief unit to assist with this effort and volunteers were connected with seniors and others needing help. Other agencies offered cleaning supplies, assistance with filling out disaster aid applications, furniture donations, financial supports and information on disaster preparedness. This was truly a collaborative effort with various partners working together to provide the physical, emotional and financial supports needed by those affected by the disaster.

211 Eastern Region Connects with the County of Prescott-Russell during Floods

When the Spring floods of 2017 affected many regions in the County of Prescott-Russell, 211 Eastern Region reached out to the most affected municipality of Clarence-Rockland to offer assistance in handling inquiries from those affected by the floods. Since then, ongoing meetings are being held to document the needs identified during this event, to inform municipalities of the role 211 can play in times of emergencies, and emergency protocols are being developed. Through these initiatives, 211 has demonstrated they can play an essential supporting role during a local emergency.

211 Central South Provides Scheduling for Community Income Tax Clinics Pilot

For many years, 211 Central South has worked in partnership with the United Way of Niagara Falls and Greater Fort Erie in helping people file their taxes, and access important financial benefits, through the Community Volunteer Income Tax Program. In addition to providing support in navigating services and finding income tax clinics, 211 Central South offered appointment scheduling to callers. This year, through a pilot project, the partnership expanded to include six other community partners. A key benefit of this pilot was the increased support and linkage to services for individuals who called 211 to schedule their tax appointment. Through this pilot, we helped to increase the capacity of local organizations to conduct income tax clinics. Over 1300 tax returns were filed and over three million dollars in benefits accessed for struggling families.

211 Central East Supports Mental Health Crisis Line for Children and Youth

A partnership with 211 has been key for service providers in Muskoka, Parry Sound and Nipissing in launching a new 24/7, bilingual mental health crisis line for children, youth, their families, caregivers and service providers. 211’s Community Navigators answer the toll-free line, listen to the needs of callers and follow prescribed protocols to connect each caller to the right help. 211 brings value to this partnership as their teams are already trained in crisis intervention and mediated assessment. 211 is also 24/7, bilingual, and has the technical infrastructure to support on-boarding specialized lines which make this 24/7 crisis line affordable for small populations like Muskoka, Parry Sound and Nipissing.

Health Care Referrals for Patients in Poverty

The Family Health Teams in South Georgian Bay and Orillia are screening patients for poverty to identify those impacted by the social determinants of health. With consent from these patients, physicians send a referral form to 211. 211’s Community Navigators then contact each patient and conduct mediated assessments of their needs and connect the patients with the services and supports they need. The Navigators provide advocacy for vulnerable patients who need extra help, and conduct follow-up calls to ensure services have been accessed. 211 reports back to the primary care provider with the outcomes of each referral.

Community Asset App for Police Services Launched

A partnership between Ryerson University, Toronto Police Services, The City of Toronto and Findhelp/211 Central has given community policing another tool to help people get the support they need. The Community Asset Portal is a smartphone app, developed by students at Ryerson University, which provides a scrollable map of 211 data, connecting officers to community support services including shelters, mental-health services in their area and 211 Specialists at 211 Central. The app is an easy-to-use portal that allows officers to find appropriate services immediately for an individual experiencing a mental health crisis.

Barriers to Early Assessment & Treatment (BEAT)

The NorthBEAT project, a collaborative system of health, mental health and sector-specific service providers, aims to address barriers to early assessment and treatment (BEAT) for youth experiencing psychosis in Northwestern Ontario. In 2017, 211 North assisted the project coordinating team with enhancing the mental health care system for youth with psychosis by mapping different pathways to mental health care and identifying the community resources available to youth and their families. NorthBEAT’s primary objective is to increase collaboration and improve coordination within the system as well as expand its capacity to better meet the needs of youth experiencing psychosis. This regional network will help co-design resources, develop a community service inventory with maps, and integrate Early Psychosis Intervention into policy and practice. The project will continue until Spring 2021 and will give 211 the opportunity to educate community partners and community members about the value of 211 in Northwestern Ontario.

Navigating a Changing Landscape

On behalf of my Board colleagues, I want to thank our staff, our partners, their Board members, and our funders for working with us to innovate, to imagine, and to implement changes to our 211 system, while continuing to deliver high-quality service for our users.

Jim Alexander

President

The 211 system in Ontario is stronger when we work together towards a shared vision, and I am encouraged by our progress to date.

But we are not through yet…and, in fact, we anticipate that more changes will be required in the coming years to become more efficient in our own operations, and to ensure that we can effectively work across organizations, across provincial ministries, and across sectors to reduce duplication and create better service outcomes for people who need support.  We also anticipate shifting our business model to ensure that Ontarians can access our service when they need it, in the way they want to access it. We will explore new delivery channels and new technologies that can increase our capacity to help more people.

We will continue to seek input from our stakeholders along the way about how 211 can best meet the needs of Ontarians while we navigate changes in Government, changes in technology and changes to the human services landscape.  We will remain focused on our vision of an Ontario where people are enabled to live independently and thrive in their communities, and where our human services system is strong and responsive to changing needs.

Thank you to everyone who played a part in our work last year– Regional Service Partners, Data Partners, local and provincial sector partners and front-line agencies, local United Ways and municipalities who support and fund our work. We’d especially like to thank the Ontario Ministry of Children, Community and Social Services who have continued to support our ongoing operations and integration into the human services delivery system in Ontario.  While our work together is far from done, we appreciate your passion, your support and your contributions to our shared vision, and hope that we will continue to work together to deliver even better results in the coming years.

Read more about where we are going

Financial Highlights

While there are many sources of support for the 211 service across the province, the numbers below represent the sources of revenue and associated expenses for Ontario 211 Services. Revenue and expenses did not change substantially from the previous year – we continued to benefit from funding from MCSS, Green Shield Canada, Good2Talk and local United Ways for important projects. Purely administrative costs represent over 4% of total expenses, while more than 90% of our budget continues to be allocated to direct service delivery or associated program and infrastructure investments.

Revenue

$5,350,154

  • Ministry of Community and Social Services 78.06%
  • Projects 14.68%
  • United Way 7.23%
  • Other 0.03%

Expenses

$5,327,117

  • Service Delivery 69.73%
  • Project Management and Advisory Services 12.00%
  • Salaries & Management Services 9.83%
  • Marketing & Communications 1.74%
  • Governance & System Development 1.43%
  • Other 0.95%

NOTE: EXTRACTED FROM AUDITED STATEMENTS. COPIES OF AUDITED STATEMENTS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR UPON REQUEST.

Learn More About 211

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Contributors to Ontario 211 Services

Ontario 211 Services receives financial support from municipal and provincial governments, from local United Way organizations, and from private sector funders.

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Partners

211 Ontario has partnered with several organizations to improve access to community and social services across Ontario.

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Board of Directors

Learn more about our board of directors who volunteer their time to provide strategic direction and oversight to Ontario 211 Services.