Collaborating for the Public Good

group of people - senior, doctor, mother

211: A Public Utility

We want 211 to be fully leveraged by governments, by social service and health agencies, and by Ontario’s residents, and we will continue to improve the way we deliver 211 data back to communities to aid in research, planning and investment decisions.

A Year of Innovation

Improving our online experience was the theme last year.

Impact of Our Work

The numbers tell the story of who calls 211, what they are looking for and how we helped them.

Better Together

Dozens of partnerships at the local and provincial level are improving access to services.

Where to From Here?

211 aspires to be the primary source of information on human services in Ontario.

A Year of Innovation

They say that change is the only constant in life, and that is especially true at 211. 211 in Ontario is constantly challenged to evolve and work differently to meet the demands of its users.

headshot of Karen smiling

Karen Miligan

Executive Director

“From ending youth homelessness, to addressing the need for mental health and addiction support, to helping people with intellectual disabilities and isolated seniors continue to live independently, collaboration across systems is imperative in order to better serve those who might otherwise fall through the cracks.”

Some of the external trends that influenced our work last year included the ever-increasing demand for programs and services that address individual health and community well being, and the growing desire for collaboration between governments, health and social service agencies and community support organizations towards similar goals. From ending youth homelessness, to addressing the need for mental health and addiction support, to helping people with intellectual disabilities and isolated seniors continue to live independently, collaboration across systems is imperative in order to better serve those who might otherwise fall through the cracks.

Innovation was the major theme of our work last year. Our new web portal was launched in February of 2017, and made use of cutting-edge technologies for improving the search experience for users. The same technology was leveraged to improve the ways that 211’s resource data can be shared for public good initiatives through an API. And our integrated phone platform was leveraged to create service delivery efficiencies for 211. Instead of building new infrastructure our partners can leverage these technologies for specialized services.

The 211 system in Ontario continued to innovate service delivery across multiple sectors, becoming the front door to specialized services such as an abuse and neglect reporting line, a student mental health and addictions helpline, a racism reporting line, and a helpline for developmental services. In addition, we engaged experts from across the country to examine ways to leverage 211 needs data for social benefit.

The vision for 211 in Ontario has never been clearer – to connect people to services that improve their health and well-being, and to improve the social infrastructure by providing valuable data about human services to decision-makers. 211 has become a critical resource and strong partner for governments, agencies, first responders and primary care practitioners who work collectively to address some of our most challenging community issues.

Through all of the change and innovation, we are proud that our service levels have improved, and our callers continue to say they would call 211 again, and would refer it to a friend. From our Community Navigators, to our Data Editors, to our Outreach staff and leadership, there is a shared passion for helping people access the supports they need to thrive. There is also a keen understanding of the collaborative role that 211 plays in supporting communities, as demonstrated by our many successful partnerships across Ontario.

This report highlights some of the key activities and achievements of the 211 system in Ontario last year. It is a snapshot of the work performed every day across the province – one person at a time.

Read the full year in review

Impact of Our Work

211’s impact is demonstrated in the number of connections to resources made every day through our phone service, through our online channels, and through our many community and provincial partnerships. The numbers tell the story of who calls 211, what they are looking for, and how we helped them. They also tell the story of improvements in people’s well-being as a result of being connected to services, and to their communities.

Caller Demographics

74

%

of callers are adults

11

%

of callers are older adults

15

%

age is unknown

64

%

of callers are female

Caller Outcomes

253,522

referrals made to community and social services

88

%

of callers felt they were better prepared

69

%

of callers feel getting help from a program or service improved their health

    Why people called 211 in Ontario

  • Legal, Consumer & Public Safety

    35,522

  • Health Care

    29,857

  • Individual, Family & Community Support

    27,314

  • Income Support / Assistance

    26,473

  • Housing

    20,441

  • Information Services

    20,037

  • Mental Health / Addictions

    12,353

  • Food / Meals

    11,397

  • Government / Economic Services

    11,299

  • Utility Assistance

    8,428

  • Transportation

    6,710

  • Arts, Culture & Recreation

    4,267

  • Education

    3,667

  • Clothing / Personal / Household Needs

    3,623

  • Employment

    2,871

  • Volunteers / Donations

    2,765

  • Disaster Services

    1,025

    Why people called 211 in Ontario

  • Legal, Consumer & Public Safety

    35,522

  • Health Care

    29,857

  • Individual, Family & Community Support

    27,314

  • Income Support / Assistance

    26,473

  • Housing

    20,441

  • Information Services

    20,037

  • Mental Health / Addictions

    12,353

  • Food / Meals

    11,397

  • Government / Economic Services

    11,299

  • Utility Assistance

    8,428

  • Transportation

    6,710

  • Arts, Culture & Recreation

    4,267

  • Education

    3,667

  • Clothing / Personal / Household Needs

    3,623

  • Employment

    2,871

  • Volunteers / Donations

    2,765

  • Disaster Services

    1,025

Caller Satisfaction

364,621

calls made to 211 in 2016

84

%

of callers were satisfied with 211

88

%

of callers followed up with the referral 211 provided

211 Online

508,558

website sessions

1.926

M

social media impressions

Number of Programs and Services Maintained in the 211 Database

30,872

agency records

42,021

sites delivered to

59,880

services listed

58,000

records updated in 2016

211 Online

508,558

website sessions

30,872

M

social media impressions

Number of Programs and Services Maintained in the 211 Database

42,021

agency records

59,880

sites delivered to

58,000

services listed

508,558

records updated in 2016

Caller Stories

Help for Woman Who Left an Abusive Relationship

A woman called 211 looking for multiple services including food, financial help, divorce law, a personal support worker (PSW) and housing help. She had recently left an abusive relationship and was feeling overwhelmed by her situation. The I&R Specialist provided referrals for each of the callers needs as well as the Assaulted Women’s Helpline and in-person counseling programs. Upon follow up, the I&R Specialist confirmed the woman was getting help from the referrals provided. The woman indicated that she was satisfied with the services and already had a mental health worker in place. A warm transfer was provided to the Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) to inquire about a PSW support.

Prosthesis for Senior

A 79 year old man whose only income was Old Age Security and the Canada Pension Plan, called 211 looking for financial assistance to purchase a prosthesis. He was referred to the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care Assistive Device Program (ADP) and War Amps. 211 would advocate and contact the local St Vincent de Paul and Lions Club to see if they could assist with outstanding balance. Both of the local charities were willing to assist with the balance owing once. A 211 Community Navigator provided a letter of support for the caller. On following up, we found out that the ADP program would provide $2,796.75 and War Amps $1,000.00. St Vincent de Paul provided $400.00 and Lions Club paid $379.79, thus paying for the prosthetics in full. Caller was extremely thankful and that he would certainly call 211 again if he needed any other assistance.

Kindly Landlord Helps Terminal Ill Tenant Get Services Through 211

A landlord called with concerns about a tenant, with very limited income, who had recently been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. The landlord shared her concerns about the individual, as he had decided against medical treatment and had no family or friends for support. Following an assessment, 211 provided referrals to the Canadian Cancer Society, Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) and Canadian Mental Health Association’s Support Coordination Service. During a 211 initiated follow up phone call, it was confirmed that the landlord was able to connect her tenant with CMHA who was now providing ongoing service coordination and support to the terminally ill patient.

211 Helps A Family Access the Community’s Generosity During the Holidays

A man called during the Christmas season and requested help. He had already been to his Community Centre, but they were no longer accepting registrations for The Caring and Sharing Exchange/Toy Mountain programs; however, the worker had suggested calling 211. The client mentioned that he needed help because his Child Tax Benefit payments were discontinued since he had not filed his income taxes. The I&R Specialist connected the caller with the a Hamper Program, Toy Mountain’s Toy Centre, and a local income tax clinic. The client was relieved that he would get the help he needed.

211 Helps Newcomer to Thunder Bay Connect with Health and Social Supports

An stressed woman called 211 feeling overwhelmed with her recent move to Northern Ontario. She indicated that she was hesitant to relocate in the first place because of her many health issues and was now missing the company and support of her family and friends. The 211 Specialist connected her with the local distress centre and followed up with her the next day. During the follow-up conversation it became clear that the caller needed help with mental health issues, as well as medical services. The 211 Specialist referred the caller to the Community Health Centre, located not only close to her home, but a service that serves people who have a higher risk of poor health, offering programs that consider social, emotional and financial needs of its clients. Its team features family physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, counsellors, dieticians and community health workers. The caller was happy to hear that its programming also included recreational activities for seniors and volunteer opportunities that would help her meet new people in the community.

211 Helps Low Income Senior Get Financial Help for Dentures

A senior woman whose only source of income is the Canada Pension Plan called 211 looking for some help to pay for new dentures. She was referred to Ontario Works to apply for some discretionary funding and it was suggested that she talk to her bank about a line of credit or loan, since she owns her home. On following up, the 211 Specialist found out that the she had been provided with an application for funding and had an appointment with a local agency to get help filling in the application. She said the 211 Specialist was “very helpful” and that she would definitely call 211 again if she needed any other assistance.

Help for Woman Who Left an Abusive Relationship

A woman called 211 looking for multiple services including food, financial help, divorce law, a personal support worker (PSW) and housing help. She had recently left an abusive relationship and was feeling overwhelmed by her situation. The I&R Specialist provided referrals for each of the callers needs as well as the Assaulted Women’s Helpline and in-person counseling programs. Upon follow up, the I&R Specialist confirmed the woman was getting help from the referrals provided. The woman indicated that she was satisfied with the services and already had a mental health worker in place. A warm transfer was provided to the Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) to inquire about a PSW support.

Prosthesis for Senior

A 79 year old man whose only income was Old Age Security and the Canada Pension Plan, called 211 looking for financial assistance to purchase a prosthesis. He was referred to the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care Assistive Device Program (ADP) and War Amps. 211 would advocate and contact the local St Vincent de Paul and Lions Club to see if they could assist with outstanding balance. Both of the local charities were willing to assist with the balance owing once. A 211 Community Navigator provided a letter of support for the caller. On following up, we found out that the ADP program would provide $2,796.75 and War Amps $1,000.00. St Vincent de Paul provided $400.00 and Lions Club paid $379.79, thus paying for the prosthetics in full. Caller was extremely thankful and that he would certainly call 211 again if he needed any other assistance.

Kindly Landlord Helps Terminal Ill Tenant Get Services Through 211

A landlord called with concerns about a tenant, with very limited income, who had recently been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. The landlord shared her concerns about the individual, as he had decided against medical treatment and had no family or friends for support. Following an assessment, 211 provided referrals to the Canadian Cancer Society, Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) and Canadian Mental Health Association’s Support Coordination Service. During a 211 initiated follow up phone call, it was confirmed that the landlord was able to connect her tenant with CMHA who was now providing ongoing service coordination and support to the terminally ill patient.

211 Helps A Family Access the Community’s Generosity During the Holidays

A man called during the Christmas season and requested help. He had already been to his Community Centre, but they were no longer accepting registrations for The Caring and Sharing Exchange/Toy Mountain programs; however, the worker had suggested calling 211. The client mentioned that he needed help because his Child Tax Benefit payments were discontinued since he had not filed his income taxes. The I&R Specialist connected the caller with the a Hamper Program, Toy Mountain’s Toy Centre, and a local income tax clinic. The client was relieved that he would get the help he needed.

211 Helps Newcomer to Thunder Bay Connect with Health and Social Supports

An stressed woman called 211 feeling overwhelmed with her recent move to Northern Ontario. She indicated that she was hesitant to relocate in the first place because of her many health issues and was now missing the company and support of her family and friends. The 211 Specialist connected her with the local distress centre and followed up with her the next day. During the follow-up conversation it became clear that the caller needed help with mental health issues, as well as medical services. The 211 Specialist referred the caller to the Community Health Centre, located not only close to her home, but a service that serves people who have a higher risk of poor health, offering programs that consider social, emotional and financial needs of its clients. Its team features family physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, counsellors, dieticians and community health workers. The caller was happy to hear that its programming also included recreational activities for seniors and volunteer opportunities that would help her meet new people in the community.

211 Helps Low Income Senior Get Financial Help for Dentures

A senior woman whose only source of income is the Canada Pension Plan called 211 looking for some help to pay for new dentures. She was referred to Ontario Works to apply for some discretionary funding and it was suggested that she talk to her bank about a line of credit or loan, since she owns her home. On following up, the 211 Specialist found out that the she had been provided with an application for funding and had an appointment with a local agency to get help filling in the application. She said the 211 Specialist was “very helpful” and that she would definitely call 211 again if she needed any other assistance.

Better Together

211 continues to be powered by partnerships – delivering value to the system by providing an easy front door to services, and enabling the sharing of 211’s resource data for specialized portals and directories. There are dozens of initiatives at a local and provincial level that leverage 211’s information and referral expertise, or comprehensive resource data. And our integrated 21 service delivery system is stronger because it leverages the capacity and knowledge of professionals across the province. Collaboration is part of our DNA…read on to learn about how we are Better Together.

Provincial Partnerships

Last year, we continued to develop and pursue provincial partnerships that leverage 211 infrastructure and staff expertise. We began answering the first call to the Good2Talk service, improving the access to counselling and information and referral service for post-secondary students in Ontario. We also continued our work with Green Shield Canada on Opening Doors to Better Health – an initiative that allows us to work with our 211 National Service Partners to ensure that we can connect people who are uninsured or underinsured to the health and social services they need to stay well.

We continued to partner with Ontario College of Family Physicians and Centre for Effective Practice on an electronic Poverty Screening Tool, and received funding from the provincial Poverty Reduction Fund to pull 211 resource data about social and community supports into the tool for physicians based on patient’s location. We also began answering a reporting line for neglect and abuse of adults with developmental disabilities, providing general information on supports in the community where appropriate, and documenting any reports requiring investigation to officials. Learn more about our provincial partnerships and how they are improving access, creating efficiencies and improving outcomes.

“Ontario 211 system has been an invaluable partner in helping the ministry deliver on several ministry initiatives, including the ReportON service. The Team at ON211 is professional, reliable and diligent in delivering on its commitments.”

The Honourable Dr. Helena Jaczek

Minister of Community and Social Services

Regional Partnerships

Our 211 Regional Service Partners (our six Ontario contact centres: Collingwood, Ottawa, St. Catharines, Thunder Bay, Toronto and Windsor) which are pinned on the map, have been actively establishing partnerships in local communities and counties this year. From a Racism Reporting Line, to after-hours support for Child Welfare Issues, to referral programs with paramedics and physicians, to using 211 as a front door for youth homelessness, 211 is becoming known more and more as an effective partner on initiatives that address community well-being. See the stories below for more information.

Partnership Stories

Collaboration Develops Community Asset App for Police Services

A partnership between Ryerson University, Toronto Police Services, The City of Toronto and Findhelp/211 Central will improve community policing and help people get the support they need. The Community Asset Portal is a smartphone app developed by students at Ryerson University. It provides a scrollable map of 211 information data that connects officers to community support services including shelters, mental-health services in their area and 211 Specialists at 211 Central. The app is an easy to use portal that will allow officers to immediately find appropriate services for an individual experiencing a mental health crisis.

Railway Suicide Prevention – Northumberland County

To offset the many calls for assistance along Northumberland rail lines to local police services and rail police services, Northumberland Safe Communities Committee posted signs they hope will have a high impact on individuals who will stop to read the sign and call 911 or 211 to reach out for help. Northumberland County does not have a 24/7 crisis line and the partnership with 211 will ensure callers get connected to the professional services they need anywhere in Ontario, 24/7 in 150+ languages.

211 Central South Partners with Niagara Emergency Medical Services

Niagara EMS identified that paramedics often see underlying issues of concern when responding to 911 calls. While they have a protocol to refer patients directly to the CCAC for health-related issues, they were seeking another option for paramedics when they see that a patient has needs related to the social determinants of health (housing, hunger, etc.). As part of this important initiative, Niagara EMS staff received training on 211 and on the social determinants of health. When they identify other needs that patients may have, Niagara EMS will encourage them to call 211 and provide the patient with a 211 referral in writing. Patients are encouraged to tell 211 who referred them and the reason for the referral. This project launched with training in February 2017.

Collaboration Has Helped Community Find Help During Holiday Season

Since 2009, 211 Eastern Region has worked in collaboration with The Caring and Sharing Exchange (C&SE) to help serve clients who need assistance during the Christmas season. Over the years, this partnership has allowed thousands of families to receive aid. It has been rewarding yet challenging as the service demands keep increasing but the system’s capacity remains the same. In 2016, 211 Eastern Region and The Caring and Sharing Exchange worked to develop the details of their existing partnership: objectives can be set to appropriately serve clients, and Information and Referral Specialists are now better equipped to handle these requests.

Helping Students Start the School Year off Right

In 2016, United Way Oxford County, a group of community agencies, big business and 211 Ontario began collaborating to deliver an innovative and efficient school supplies program. Rather than giving out back packs filled with school supplies, the Supplies 4 Students program provides recipients with a voucher to shop at their local Staples store and pick out exactly what they need to start the school year off right. Over 200 Oxford residents called 211 to register for this program and it was such a success that it will continue in 2017!

Racism Reporting Line

211 North was invited to join the Incident Response Committee, a joint committee of Diversity Thunder Bay and the City of Thunder Bay’s Anti-Racism & Respect Advisory Committee to explore options for individuals to report incidents of racism in Thunder Bay. The committee identified the benefits and value of using 211 which offers individual anonymity and confidentiality so is a safe place to report incidents of racism, discrimination, bias and oppression. 211 can also provide referrals appropriate to each individual caller’s needs. Callers would be given the following options to report: by phone, online or in-person. This pilot project would provide baseline data which would help the City to assess and record the magnitude of racism in our community. This project was approved by Thunder Bay City Council and became available June 27, 2017, The project has two main goals: a) to validate a person’s experience; create a place where individuals can say “this happened to me”, and to know that someone is listening; b) begin to track these types of incidents to develop a sense of where and when they’re happening in particular by type; location of occurrence and frequency.

Simcoe County Community Paramedicine Program

Community paramedicine allows paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) to operate in expanded roles to provide routine healthcare services to underserved populations, and helps to improve rural emergency medical services (EMS). 211’s Community Navigators receive referrals from Community Paramedicine and contact each patient to conduct a further assessment on identified needs, provide advocacy and follow- up to ensure connections to community services and are made.

Collaboration Develops Community Asset App for Police Services

A partnership between Ryerson University, Toronto Police Services, The City of Toronto and Findhelp/211 Central will improve community policing and help people get the support they need. The Community Asset Portal is a smartphone app developed by students at Ryerson University. It provides a scrollable map of 211 information data that connects officers to community support services including shelters, mental-health services in their area and 211 Specialists at 211 Central. The app is an easy to use portal that will allow officers to immediately find appropriate services for an individual experiencing a mental health crisis.

Railway Suicide Prevention – Northumberland County

To offset the many calls for assistance along Northumberland rail lines to local police services and rail police services, Northumberland Safe Communities Committee posted signs they hope will have a high impact on individuals who will stop to read the sign and call 911 or 211 to reach out for help. Northumberland County does not have a 24/7 crisis line and the partnership with 211 will ensure callers get connected to the professional services they need anywhere in Ontario, 24/7 in 150+ languages.

211 Central South Partners with Niagara Emergency Medical Services

Niagara EMS identified that paramedics often see underlying issues of concern when responding to 911 calls. While they have a protocol to refer patients directly to the CCAC for health-related issues, they were seeking another option for paramedics when they see that a patient has needs related to the social determinants of health (housing, hunger, etc.). As part of this important initiative, Niagara EMS staff received training on 211 and on the social determinants of health. When they identify other needs that patients may have, Niagara EMS will encourage them to call 211 and provide the patient with a 211 referral in writing. Patients are encouraged to tell 211 who referred them and the reason for the referral. This project launched with training in February 2017.

Collaboration Has Helped Community Find Help During Holiday Season

Since 2009, 211 Eastern Region has worked in collaboration with The Caring and Sharing Exchange (C&SE) to help serve clients who need assistance during the Christmas season. Over the years, this partnership has allowed thousands of families to receive aid. It has been rewarding yet challenging as the service demands keep increasing but the system’s capacity remains the same. In 2016, 211 Eastern Region and The Caring and Sharing Exchange worked to develop the details of their existing partnership: objectives can be set to appropriately serve clients, and Information and Referral Specialists are now better equipped to handle these requests.

Helping Students Start the School Year off Right

In 2016, United Way Oxford County, a group of community agencies, big business and 211 Ontario began collaborating to deliver an innovative and efficient school supplies program. Rather than giving out back packs filled with school supplies, the Supplies 4 Students program provides recipients with a voucher to shop at their local Staples store and pick out exactly what they need to start the school year off right. Over 200 Oxford residents called 211 to register for this program and it was such a success that it will continue in 2017!

Racism Reporting Line

211 North was invited to join the Incident Response Committee, a joint committee of Diversity Thunder Bay and the City of Thunder Bay’s Anti-Racism & Respect Advisory Committee to explore options for individuals to report incidents of racism in Thunder Bay. The committee identified the benefits and value of using 211 which offers individual anonymity and confidentiality so is a safe place to report incidents of racism, discrimination, bias and oppression. 211 can also provide referrals appropriate to each individual caller’s needs. Callers would be given the following options to report: by phone, online or in-person. This pilot project would provide baseline data which would help the City to assess and record the magnitude of racism in our community. This project was approved by Thunder Bay City Council and became available June 27, 2017, The project has two main goals: a) to validate a person’s experience; create a place where individuals can say “this happened to me”, and to know that someone is listening; b) begin to track these types of incidents to develop a sense of where and when they’re happening in particular by type; location of occurrence and frequency.

Simcoe County Community Paramedicine Program

Community paramedicine allows paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) to operate in expanded roles to provide routine healthcare services to underserved populations, and helps to improve rural emergency medical services (EMS). 211’s Community Navigators receive referrals from Community Paramedicine and contact each patient to conduct a further assessment on identified needs, provide advocacy and follow- up to ensure connections to community services and are made.

Where to from Here

While there is still much work ahead to solidify the role of 211 within the social infrastructure in Ontario, and in Canada, I am encouraged by the ability of this 211 system to take on each new system or partnership with enthusiasm and professionalism. I believe we are nearing a tipping point for 211 in terms of its awareness and use across Ontario, and more importantly, closer to being able to demonstrate very concretely the impact of 211 on the well-being of people and communities.

headshot of Jim Alexander in a suit

Jim Alexander

President

“We are grateful to our funders – Ontario’s Ministry of Community and Social Services, United Ways in Ontario, Green Shield Canada, and many Ontario municipalities – for their commitment to supporting more than half a million connections to resources last year.”

We are grateful to our funders – Ontario’s Ministry of Community and Social Services, United Ways in Ontario, Green Shield Canada, and many Ontario municipalities – for their commitment to supporting more than half a million connections to resources last year.

The Board is also committed to further integration of the 211 system in Ontario to improve quality and deliver maximum value. We want 211 to be fully leveraged by governments, by agencies, and by residents, and will continue to improve the way we deliver 211 data back to communities to aid in research, planning and investment decisions.

After a few years of building system infrastructure and supporting integration, the 211 system is better positioned to provide support to a changing health and social services sector in Ontario. We will continue to partner with private sector organizations, such as Green Shield Canada, to build 211’s capacity to improve outcomes for vulnerable people. We will continue to work with municipalities to support their local efforts to meet community needs. And we will continue to partner with provincial government to leverage 211 as a solution for priority issues, such as poverty, homelessness, settlement, human trafficking, social isolation and more.

Thank you to the dedicated professionals who have worked incredibly hard over the last number of years to help 211 get to this point in our evolution. Our Board is grateful for the contributions of staff at our Regional Service Partners, Data Partners, local United Way organizations, municipalities, and our community partners.

Thank you to the staff at Ontario 211 Services – they are a small but mighty team, and are dedicated to building a strong system for those who want help. And finally, thank you to my fellow Board members for the countless hours of time you contribute to guiding and governing the 211 system.

We hope that you will join us in the next leg of our 211 journey…Help Starts Here!

Read more about where we are going

Financial Highlights

While there are many sources of support for the 211 service across the province, the numbers below represent the sources of revenue and associated expenses for Ontario 211 Services. Revenue and expenses increased by approximately $0.5M over the previous year due to several important projects funded by MCSS, Green Shield Canada, Good2Talk and local United Ways. Pure administration costs represent less than 4% of total expenses, while more than 90% of our budget is allocated to direct service delivery or associated program and infrastructure investments.

Revenue

$5,335,983

  • Ministry of Community and Social Services 79.91%
  • Green Shield Canada Foundation 8.56%
  • United Way 5.43%
  • Good2Talk 4.41%
  • Region of Peel 0.82%
  • Development Services Ontario 0.81%
  • Amortization of deferred contributions 0.03%

Expenses

$5,329,852

  • Service Delivery 70.26%
  • Consulting 11.05%
  • Salaries & Management Services 9.96%
  • Marketing & Communications 3.66%
  • Administrative 3.34%
  • Non Recoverable HST 0.89%
  • Governance & System Development 0.81%
  • Amortization of Capital Assets 0.03%

NOTE: EXTRACTED FROM AUDITED STATEMENTS. COPIES OF AUDITED STATEMENTS ARE AVAILABLE FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR UPON REQUEST.

Learn More About 211

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Contributors to Ontario 211 Services

Ontario 211 Services receives financial support from municipal and provincial governments, from local United Way organizations, and from private sector funders.

drawing of a senior in a wheel chair

Regional Snapshots

These snapshots provide a glimpse of the local partnerships, the number of calls to 211 and type of help residents are looking for, broken down into our 211 service regions.

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Partners

211 Ontario has partnered with several organizations to improve access to community and social services across Ontario.

drawing of a middle aged woman

Board of Directors

Learn more about our board of directors who volunteer their time to provide strategic direction and oversight to Ontario 211 Services.